Lesson 10, Topic 1
In Progress

Pedestrian Crossings

Pedestrian crossings:

There are several types of pedestrian crossing and it is your responsibility to understand how they work and how best to deal with them. Here is a list of crossings a driver may come across.

1. Zebra crossing: Give way to anyone that has moved onto the crossing (one foot on). If there is an island in the middle then each side of the road is a separate crossing. Do not wave people across the road. Do not rev your engine whilst waiting and if at the stop line then apply your handbrake.

2. Pelican crossing: The lights are activated when a pedestrian pushes a button on a box on the lights and there will be a set length of time for them to cross. When the red light shows you must stop at the stop line. At a pelican crossing the red light is followed by a flashing amber light. When the flashing amber light shows you must continue to give way to anyone on the crossing although if the crossing is clear you may proceed with caution. When a pelican crossing is straight, then even with a central island it must be treated as one crossing. If it is staggered then it is treated as two separate crossings.

3. Puffin crossing: The lights are activated in the same way as a pelican crossing. The length of time the pedestrian has to cross is determined by sensors on the lights that sense when the crossing has been cleared and so changing the lights back to green to allow the traffic to go. The light sequence seen by the vehicles is the same as at traffic lights.

4. Toucan crossing: The lights are activated in the same way as a pelican crossing. Toucan crossings are used by both pedestrians and cyclists. The light sequence seen by the vehicles is the same as at traffic lights.

5. Equestrian crossing: The lights are activated in the same way as a pelican crossing although the box will be very much higher for the horse rider to reach. These crossings may be alongside those for pedestrians and cyclists. The light sequence seen by the vehicles is the same as at traffic lights.

6. School crossing patrols: You must obey any signals given by the police officer, traffic warden or school patrol warden with a stop sign. If asked to stop then leave plenty of room for people to cross.

Look out for any warning signs or signals telling you of any pedestrian crossings coming up that may be obscured from view.

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